Archive for November, 2016

November 28, 2016

Pixies Tracks Of The Week @NewhamGenerals @WileyUpdates @BlakieA @Callmecadet

Newham Generals x Wiley – Unruly

Three of Grime’s foundational and important people link up for a momentous collaboration “Unruly” where they take to the streets of Newham for a gritty Grime riddim which matches the menacing visuals.

Wiley – U Were Always, Pt.2 feat. Skepta & Belly

Wiley takes it back to old skool Roll Deep days as he brings us “U Were Always Pt.2,” sampling SWV’s ‘Fine Time”. It features North London MC’s Skepta and Belly in this sultry slow jam. This will be on his forthcoming “Godfather” album out Jan 2017.

Blakie – Can’t See Them

19 year-old South East London lyricist Blakie releases his debut single “Can’t See Them” which shows him stepping out on his own from crew The Square for this fun and energetic Grime track produced by The Square member Lolingo.

Cadet – Ooouuu (Remix)

Cadet puts his own stamp on Young Ma’s “Ooouuu” as he gives it a remix. It’s joined by dance heavy visuals that suit the bouncy track well as Cadet lays down some sick bars.

 

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November 17, 2016

Sneakbo Interview

Sneakbo was one of the first artists in the UK responsible for mixing Afrobeat with Rap, which is an impressive feat. A lot of artists are now following suit, building upon the increasingly interesting platform that Sneakbo has helped create.

After 6 years of being independent, paving the way and kicking down doors for UK Rap, he’s now signed to Virgin EMI and in an even better position to become bigger than ever. He’s not had an easy life, but Sneakbo is a fighter, and his passion for music has kept him going. I caught up with the intriguing artist to find out more.

You say music saved your life. Can you tell us how?

Before music I was just out and about. When I found music it kept me focused and I didn’t get into much trouble, and I was just doing what I love and I’m getting paid for it. I know what I’m doing now and I’m doing good things.

Let’s talk about you being signed to Virgin EMI recently. Tell us the story behind it, how did it happen?

I’ve been independent for 6 years and I think it was March or April that I signed my first actual deal with Virgin EMI. It was through my manager that played them 3 singles that I had and they liked it and they signed me. We were in talks for a month before I signed the deal. Other labels were in touch, but my heart was with Virgin.

Being home to Krept & Konan and Lethal Bizzle, as well, do you feel like you’re in safe hands with the label?

Definitely. I’ve seen what they can do and it made me more confident.

Do you feel you’ve done all you could independently or was there something else behind the move?

I wouldn’t say I’ve done all I can independently, but I felt like this was the right time to get back in and see what I do with these singles, what a label can do with these singles. It wasn’t really that I can do all I can independently, it was more to see what I can do with major backing,

Do you feel in this day and age that you can be totally independent throughout all your career or do you feel we still need labels?

I believe you can do it both ways, it just depends on the artist and the team they have behind them. You can do it both ways, if you’ve got a good team you can do it independently.

You’ve smashed it independently for around 6 years gaining Top 40 singles such as ‘Zim Zimma,’ where do you see yourself going from here on?

Hopefully bigger and better results. Hopefully higher chart positions, bigger shows, better video qualities. I just feel like everything should be better. When I was independent I was doing everything that the label is doing, right now I’m not sitting back, but a lot of things are getting done that I’m not doing. There’s a major difference.

Your style is very unique, mixing Afrobeat with Rap, do you see any other artists now being influenced from your style and how do you feel seeing this?

I see loads of artists doing it now, especially the newcomers. I’m happy and it shows I’m doing something right and what I’m doing people are following it. I don’t feel they are copying or nothing like that. I’m definitely proud. At first I can’t lie, I used to feel funny when I heard a song, and I thought nah this person is copying my style. Now that people are mentioning it to me, you feel proud that people are following your style, and I’m happy people can see that. It makes me feel better. I rate J Hus, I rate Timbo, I rate Mologo.

How do you make sure your sound is always different and distinct?

I’m just focused on making bangers and hits. I’m not fussed if anyone goes with that style, I’m just focused on myself, the wave, the jetski wave.

What’s your opinion on the UK Rap scene now?

I’m proud of it. I’m happy because it’s changed a lot. 4-5 years ago you would have had to make a certain type of music to get loads of radio play, but now they accept us for our music and what we like making. It’s changed a lot.

How would you compare it to when you first started out?

A lot more underground and unsigned artists are doing a lot more shows. Before you had to be signed to kind of be doing well and doing good shows, but now you can go on Link Up TV and drop a hot song and you can do well.

How has being from Brixton influenced your style of music?

Being from Brixton I grew up with loads of Jamaicans, I’m Nigerian, but in Brixton there’s loads of Jamaicans, and when I go to the clubs and that and they used to play bashment, bashment, bashment, that’s what made me love it and start jumping on it. My new single ‘Too Cool’ it’s on a bashment track called ‘Bookshelf Riddim’ that came about from me listening to bashment from young.

What’s a defining moment that changed your career and or life?

When I made ‘Touch Ah Button’, that’s when I started getting shows and that’s what started making the industry interested in me.

You’ve just dropped your first single ‘Too Cool (Right Here)’ since being signed, what was the process behind the track, and how has the reaction been?

The reaction so far has been great. It’s getting loads of radio play, the video is doing well. I’ve had a great reaction, all my fans have been messaging me good messages about it. The video was shot in LA. My manager set it up for Nyla to be on the song, but I knew about her for a long time, she had a big song called ‘Love Is Wicked.’

Any plans for an album?

Right now I’m working on the album, I’ve got a couple songs ready, so hopefully next year I’ll have the album finished and ready to drop. The next single will hopefully be next November time, it will be wavy, even better.

What’s next for Sneakbo?

I’ve got to plan the video for the next single. Lots more work.

 

November 8, 2016

The Sounds Of UK Rap @Frankofraize @Blademusic @MicRighteous @realmostack @KojeyRadical

Franko Fraize – ‘Tell Me A Word’

Fresh from his Maida Vale session for Radio 1, Franko Fraize returned with the excellent ‘Tell Me A Word.’ It was first played by Huw Stephens, but it now comes with a video for us all to enjoy.

‘Tell Me A Word’ is the perfect example of his down-to-earth approach as he discusses the stresses of life, not talking trash about other people, and loads more. The video takes us through a journey from outside a kebab shop, down the high street, and past a packed bar. It’s witty and it’s real.

Blade Brown – ‘Plug Talk’

Blade Brown doesn’t play around when it comes to his videos and for his new one – ‘Plug Talk’ – he heads out to the Nevada desert and downtown LA.

Blade spits some hard, street bars where he states, “these n****s better listen when the plug talks, bricks on bricks on bricks man that’s a plugs thought, and now these little n****s they can’t walk with me, you need like 50,000 just to talk to me.” In the video we see Blade living an expensive lifestyle out in the states, driving a Mustang and living in a mansion.

Mic Righteous – ‘I Turn Up’

Mic Righteous is hitting us hard with some new visuals from his Dreamlandalbum which is out now and popping on the iTunes chart.

Mic’s energy on this track is 100, and he adds a comical value to the video too, making it an interesting watch. Have a read through his chorus lyrics: “What is it then? I’m down for whatever login and send, you turn up in the club with a drink, I turn up with a kosh and a pen, fuck you mean. Come to my manor with gun chatter, then get hit in the head with a buss hammer.”

Kojey Radical ft. PW- ‘Gallons’

Kojey Radical is a contemporary artist and poet who releases pieces of work that will leave you thinking. His new one – ‘Gallons’ – does just that too; it’s heartfelt and compelling and tells a story of race, class, and struggle.

The visuals are striking, showing Kojey adorned in black against the backdrop of a futuristic version of London in a dystopian world. He says of the track, “‘Gallons’ is a uniting of class, it’s a celebration of struggle. The conversation doesn’t die when you kill us. Seeds of positivity will ensure that the beauty in all our differences will come together and grow for future generations.”

Mostack feat. Krept, Konan & J Hus – ‘Liar Liar’ Remix

Mostack has been steadily on the rise this year, coming out with anthem after anthem. His ‘Liar Liar’ track (released in September) is nearing 5 million hits, but has now been given an official remix by Krept, Konan and J Hus. It’s as mad as you’d expect, with the three artists bringing their hardest bars. It bangs even harder than the original.

November 7, 2016

Pixies Tracks Of The Week @Footsie @izziegibbs @KingPMoney @SCRUFIZZER @AJFromTheLane

Footsie – My Team

Footsie dedicates a track to his team. Produced by OGTaxx of American production team 808 Mafia, Footsie spits some hard bars over a trap lead beat, lighting a spliff for the people who keep it real with him.

Izzie Gibbs – Bare Talk On Road

Izzie Gibbs hits us with a brand new video ‘Bare Talk On Road’ taken from his ‘Jutsu’ EP. We see him step out a barber shop where Big Narstie is waiting to go in. The Northampton MC delivers a message with his fierce flow.

P Money ft. JME & Wiley – Gunfingers

Three of some of Grime’s best lyricists unite for ‘Gunfingers’. P Money, JME and Wiley all throw down bars in a tribute to gunfingers, a signal done in a rave to show appreciation for the track. The track produced by Skepta has an old-skool vibe to it, and is taken from P Money’s forthcoming album ‘Live & Direct’.

Scrufizzer X Aubrey Whyte – Out & Bad

Scrufizzer switches it up for his new one with actor Aubrey White, where he gets rawer than usual for ‘Out & Bad’. Scrufizzer flows over a hard-hitting, dark beat with a heavy bassline, with his trademark adlibs present too.

AJ Tracey – Buster Cannon

One of Grime’s hottest prospects AJ Tracey drops the cinematic visuals shot in Japan to the lead single from his forthcoming EP ‘Lil Tracey’ released in December. Produced by Canada’s Tre Mission this super powered beat fits perfectly with AJ’s fast flow and dextrous wordplay.

November 1, 2016

From the corner to the stage: Dizzee Rascal at Copper Box Arena

Dizzee Rascal performed at the Copper Box Arena in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park on Saturday 22nd October – which is, of course, in the East End of London and down the road from his hometown of Bow. It was a special moment, as Dizzee returned to the stage to perform his debut, award-winning album Boy In Da Corner, 13 years after its release.

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When the album dropped, the production was noisy, rude and intelligent, and remarkably like nothing else that had been heard before (or since, really). It sounded like music bred from isolation. But last Saturday, over a decade later, 7,000 people filled the arena floors to watch Dylan Mills perform the iconic album. Warming up was friend, and another pioneer of the Grime scene, DJ Slimzee – who played tracks such as Bloodline’s ‘Side By Side’ and Terror Danjah ft Jamakabi ‘Juicy Patty.’

There aren’t many words that can describe the evening. I guess you had to be there. But if you were, you were one of the lucky ones. It was truly magical hearing this innovative album being performed live, and it took me back to my teenage days. If it wasn’t for Hyperfrank and her petition to get Dizzee to perform it again in London, and Red Bull who hosted it, this would never have happened.

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He blazed through his hour set with help from DJ MK and Bigman Scope opening with a yellow background with the black lines, trying to replicate the album cover with Dizzee sitting on a chair. He opened with track ‘Sitting Here’ with the crowd quiet, trying to take in his reflective bars.

Then the madness began as soon as ‘Stop Dat’ started with drinks flying around the standing section of the arena and mosh pits being formed, with Dizzee spraying his bars like the teenager he was when it first came out. He bounced around the stage with energy hyping up the audience as he went from side to side. He then went into another crowd favourite ‘I Luv You’ and then into ‘Brand New Day’.

DJ MK scratched the intro to ‘Fix Up Look Sharp’ whilst Dizzee jumped up and down along with the crowd who sang along to the words with him, with everyone’s hands in the air.

Another highlight of the night was when ‘Just A Rascal’ dropped and got a reload from MK as the whole crowd went wild, with Dizzee jumping up and down on the stage saying “Big up my moshpit crew,” performing the track with clarity in his skippy flow.

This album is so important to UK music, and getting the chance to relive it live was special.