Posts tagged ‘Preston Play’

September 10, 2012

Preston Play – Blackwater [Free Mixtape]

Producer Preston Play releases a free instrumental mixtape. Check out the tracklisting and download it for free below.

 

 

Download PrestonPlay – Blackwater here

April 13, 2012

Preston Play – Show Of Force Instrumentalist Mixtape

Preston Play the producer behind Mic Righteous’ production on Kampain, releases a instrumental mixtape with vocals and harmonies already recorded by him. This is free to download, and now any artist can get a beat from here and jump on any tracks.

Download Show Of Force here

April 12, 2012

Preston Play

Preston Play is the producer behind Mic Righteous’ latest release Kam-Pain. Having been brought up in Cape Town, he was introduced from a young age to music from his parents who were singers and owned a music bar there, and in the townships where he would join in playing homemade instruments. After the success of Kam-Pain and recently opening up for Talib Kweli on the UK leg of his tour, Preston Play releases an instrumentalist mixtape, singing all the hooks and harmonies himself, ready for any artist to record on it.

How did being raised in Cape Town play a part in your journey in music?
I lived on the outskirts of the Cape Town flats and near a township called Khayelitsha… Half the kids from my school lived there so obviously that was where I played and ran riot as a younger. Music is a big part of people lives in the townships, they don’t have much, but they do have each other and music. It’s not rare to find groups of people banging water drums and homemade instruments and I used to watch and dance along with my mates. Then obviously as a kid you start to want to get involved so I started banging drums and singing with everyone. It was a fun time and I learned a lot. My parents also owned a large Music Bar and I grew up in the “Bar Life” surrounded by singers and bands. It was cool as a kid. I used to love it.

Your parents were singers. Would you say this had a big impact on you?
Yeah well my dad is a great singer, he won’t admit it now though but he used to sing Roy Orbison songs at the bar nightly and was amazing. He sung all the oldies, Roy, Elvis, and Eric Clapton. My mum used to sing anything. She was really talented. I remember even at home, she would always be in the music room with headphones on playing records and singing and making mixtapes. Music was a big part of my family’s life growing up.

Did you always know you would become an artist?
You know its funny, from back then, at the age of 11, when my parents got me my first keyboard, I knew I wanted to “do music”. I have held over 20 different jobs, all in different sectors, including training and becoming a qualified chef. I always felt miserable though and hated every minute of them. Music is all I’ve ever wanted to do.

You also moved to Spain for 2 years. Musically what was the biggest thing you picked up from being there?
Spain is my second home; I have a real strong bond with Spain and feel at peace over there. I have a flat there and try to get over there as much as possible. Whilst I was there, when I was younger I worked in a Flamenco bar. I learned about melody, rhythm and the importance of music as a healing tool. The Spanish see music differently from us; to them it is a very community based activity. Everyone comes together you know?

Do you incorporate Spanish and African musical influences into your production now?
African, definitely…. My thing is percussion. I spend hours getting my drums and percussion right, sometimes before I’ve even written a line I will get that right and then play my melodies over the drums half the time, as was the case on most of ‘Kampain’. Spanish music is a strong influence on my melodies too. As I said, I learned a hell of a lot!

Why did you decide to MC on pirate radio for a year? Was MCing something you had always done?
Yeah I kind of just got into writing lyrics and MC’ing on the garage scene for a while…I still bar occasionally but only very rarely. But my music is my thing now…

Why did you start to take production seriously after being on the pirate radio circuit for a year?
I used to get bored of MC’ing over beats everybody had hit, so I decided to make my own. I sold my car and everything of value that I owned and hustled the rest to raise enough to buy a mac, a Yamaha Motif synth and an MPC. I didn’t even have speakers I done it all through headphones. It took me about 5 months more to get money for monitors! Eventually, with enough practice and WEEKS spend learning on YouTube and from other producers, I started to get good. I remember going into studios with a pen and pad and writing down everything I was shown and told. It was peak, but I done it the right way. I learned to do things properly, and all my own.

Do you believe that to make it in music you have to sacrifice everything?
For me, yes 100%. I sacrificed everything, I still do, daily. I think if you want something bad enough, you will always do what you have to do and par everything else to get that thing. If you don’t, you can’t want it that bad. I have sacrificed everything for my music. You have no idea…. Hopefully now I will start to get the recognition I feel I deserve. In the last year I have not only secured a great working relationship, and gained a good friend in Mic Righteous, but through putting in the years of work, I’ve been able to open for The Game, Talib Kweli and Lowkey with Mic as his DJ/Producer. I feel that’s a good achievement in itself for me, last year no one knew who I was hardly.

How do you decide what artists to work with?
You know what, I will contact someone if I see that raw talent and potential. I’m not interested in gun talk and how much drugs someone sells. I love rap that means something and rappers who are true to themselves and real. I will never work with someone trying to be something they are not. My art won’t work for them. There’s too much feeling in what I do…I don’t think they would get that.

You and Mic Righteous released ‘Kampain’ together. Tell us about what work went into this, and how you both put it together.
I contacted Mic and his manager, (Now also my manager) about a year ago and sent the track, ‘Take Me Away’ with the hook on it. They contacted me back straight away and we got Mic in the studio that week to record it. It went on to ‘Yob Culture’, Mic’s debut mixtape. I guess we just clicked you know? Making a mixtape together just seemed like a natural progression from doing a great track together. Next thing I know, he comes for a couple days and we have done 3 tracks, then comes for another couple days and we do another 4 then a couple weeks and we got a banging mixtape! Mic’s work rate is sickening. Perfect for my work rate.

‘Show Of Force’ is released this Friday 13th April and is an instrumental mixtape. Tell us about the ideas and concepts of this new project.
I decided that the time was right to put out something different for not only the supporters, but for artists who are struggling to find good instrumentals on the web. I have packed it with this sound Mic and I kind of came up with whilst making ‘Kampain.’ It’s got a stripped back feel. I got rid of all the generic snare rolls and “bells and whistles” I hear so many producers pack into their beats, and focused more on the real melodies and live sound that I love to listen to. I also don’t really use samples…No disrespect to anyone but I personally have never been a fan, to me, making music should be exactly that, making music. I have 2 tracks on there that use a sample, but only really to show that I can.

You sing the hooks and harmonies on nearly every track. Why did you decide to do this?
I don’t believe any producer has done it before? I wanted to give the supporters something fresh and exciting…You can listen to it as an album without any artists on it, or record vocals on it…. As far as I know, no producer has done this so I’m excited to see the response.

All my hooks and harmonies are 100% free use. Royalty free.

Which artists would you like to work with next?
I have my eyes set on a few different artists I’d love to work with and also a few up and coming artists I am keen to help develop. I am working on a lot right now.

What’s next for Preston Play after the ‘Show Of Force’ release?
Mic and I will be working on more music and I have a few things lined up to keep me busy. I’m just enjoying what I’ve got myself into and taking it day by day. I still just sit here everyday pouring my heart out into the keys…Hopefully that will get me somewhere…

Show Of Force is out Friday 13th April 2012 from micrighteous.com

Follow Preston on Twitter @IAmPrestonPlay

March 5, 2012

Mic Righteous – Sobered Up

Mic releases Sobered Up the third instalment of the skit videos off Kampain

Check out my interview with Mic Righteous here

February 23, 2012

Mic Righteous – Lean Up

The 2nd part instalment of the 3 part series of videos from Mic Righteous’ Kampain, Lean Up has dropped. Look out for the next one Sobered Up which should be out soon.

February 17, 2012

Mic Righteous & Preston Play – Liquored UP

Mic Righteous and Preston Play release the video for Liquored Up taken off their newly released mixtape Kampain. This is the first of a 3 part series, look out for Part 2, Lean Up which will be out in a few days.

Download Kampain here 

Read my interview with Mic Righteous here

January 31, 2012

Mic Righteous & Preston Play – Kam-pain (free mixtape)

The anticipated mixtape Kam-pain is out today from Mic Righteous and Preston Play.

Mic Righteous is one of the freshest, rawest talents to stem from the UK.  He has created a massive buzz, and Kam-pain has already received support on Twitter from Tine Tempah, Wiley and Wretch 32.

To download click here

This mixtape is definitely worth a contribution which you can donate online if you think it’s worth it.

Read my interview with Mic Righteous here

January 25, 2012

Mic Righteous & Preston Play – Give My All

Mic Righteous and Preston Play team up for the highly anticipated release of Kampain which is out on 31st January. They recently dropped the video Give My All as their first release off Kampain, giving us a taster of what’s to come. I personally can’t wait.

Watch the video here Mic Righteous & Preston Play – Give My All

Read my interview with Mic Righteous here 

January 11, 2012

Mic Righteous – The Mike Tyson of rap

Mic Righteous, real name Rocky, oh yes, is one of the most talented and honest rappers in the UK. His music speaks volumes and takes rap music back to its grassroots where it’s about oppressed people having a voice. His mixtape Yob Culture comes with a hard and passionate delivery of lyrics – hear his anger and hunger as he take us deeper into his world…

His parents fled Iran in the early 80s, moving to Margate to begin what they hoped would be a better life. This was not to be. By the time Mic was 10, both parents were not around, so he and his sister faced maybe going into foster care. His brother looked after them for a few years, but at the age of 14, Mic was left to survive on his own again, this time without his sister who had gone to university. He left school and his seclusion from the world took his writing to new heights; it became a form of escape.

On Yob Culture, in ‘Tied to the Tracks’, he says, ‘Mic Righteous is back, the Mike Tyson of rap.’ The former undisputed heavyweight champion of the world is where Mic Righteous he got his name. ‘I used to be called Mr Reid because my brother was called Mr Blitz. Eventually I thought that name’s kind of whack, so I decided to change it. Mic Righteous was kind of like Mike Tyson, and I was really influenced by Mike Tyson at the time; I love boxing. I just thought of Mic Righteous, it just My manager said, ‘That’s it, we need to take over now, were ready to go.’ The name suits him well as his raps are packed with punches.

Mic Righteous first came to people’s attention shortly before he turned 18, when he featured on English Frank’s album The Hardway, then on Lowkey’s LP Dear Listener, which put him at the forefront of conscious rap and brought him to the attention of hip hop’s underground movement, gaining him a fanbase worldwide. About Akala, Lowkey and English Frank he remarks, ‘All them guys, they’re my dawgs.’ What does he think about people comparing him and Lowkey, even though the differences are obvious? ‘I don’t know why people say it. I don’t think I sound like Lowkey in any way; but if I do, it’s because I listen to a lot of his music, so it’s probably rubbed off. I’ve acknowledged that people have started to clock that, but it’s not like I try and copy him, he’s just one of my friends. Lowkey took me under his wing at one point when I was young. He’s taken me to the side many times and been like, ‘This is your future.’

The two discuss politics and religion in their songs. ‘I have beliefs,’ says Mic, ‘I believe in a higher power. I don’t know about religion, but I believe it’s a basic skeleton to live your life by. Everyone knows you shouldn’t steal, you shouldn’t kill, you shouldn’t do bad things. My parents were religious and moved here – nuff said [laughs]. My mum still prays and that, but she does a lot of things that contradict her religion at the same time; but we all do, don’t we? That’s why I don’t label myself as anything; I just have my own beliefs.’ Wise for his 21 years, likely down to an emotional and turbulent life, he is also sweet, charming and open despite this.

Things are looking up now he has signed a publishing deal with Sony ATV/Naughty Words. Naughty Boy is the producer behind Emeli Sandé’s hit ‘Heaven’ and new song ‘Daddy’; he has worked with Wiley, Chipmunk and Professor Green, among others, and previously with Mic, Dot Rotten, Griminal and Sneakbo on the single ‘F**kery’. ‘I signed a few months back, so Naughty Boy is my publisher. Shah’s one of my good friends and I love Emeli Sandé, she’s like my sister.’
As we’re there on the shoot of video ‘I Know’, Mic talks about the new track and the album follow-up to Yob Culture. ‘The new track is “I Know” – Charlie Sloth and DJ Semtex have been spinning it; we’re going to put it out soon. It’s the first off the album Kampaign, and every single beat is produced by Preston Play. It’s kind of like Preston Play presents Mic Righteous’ Kampaign. This is the new thing I’m trying to bring to the table, the pain, the essence. Kampaign is the new movement, Yob Culture is the movement, Mic Righteous is the movement.’ And the next big thing.

Back to the Future
Favourite childhood memory?
Probably leaving school. Yeah, my last day of school.

Favourite childhood film?
Terminator 2.

Best food:
My mum used to make this dish called ‘subsi’, but you won’t know what that is.
We do actually…
[Looks excited] You know what it is? That’s sick! Do you like it? Oh I love you!

If you could bring a memory back from the past what would it be?
That’s quite hard… I remember one time, my brother took me out and we emptied out Coke bottles, cut them and put them on our arms so it was like we had guns on our arms…
[Anyone else confused?]
Cos the bumps at the end look like a machine gun.
[Of course…]
We took them out and pretended there were aliens in the field – then we shot them.

Favourite album?
The Marshall Mathers LP.

Favourite old-school tune?
[Ponders for some time] Tupac,
‘Hit ’Em Up’ or ‘Holla At Me’ or
‘Dear Mama’

What’s your most embarrassing
childhood moment?
Probably when you’re out and about and a bird just squats on ya. In Margate there are a lot of seagulls and one will just decide to squat on ya and it will land on your face or something. That’s pretty embarrassing.

Worst childhood telling off?
One time I had a fight, my first fight, and I got told off because I didn’t win it, so I wasn’t allowed home. I was so pissed off I went out, found the kid and slapped him. Then I went home and my dad was alright!

Follow Mic Righteous on Twitter @MicRighteous or visit http://www.micrighteous.com

* published in Flavour Magazine