Posts tagged ‘Run DMC’

July 6, 2015

Pixies Tracks Of The Week @CokesM3 @IvyLab_ @FekyOfficial @YoungsTeflon

Coco – Target Practice

Renowned Sheffield Grime artist Coco drops a fresh, new track “Target Practice” with production from another Sheffield native and legendary BBC Radio 1 and 1Xtra DJ Toddla T. Coco really shines on this track as he goes in hard with his bars with straight fire and no hooks over a dark, sub heavy instrumental. Watch out for him as he has started to become on tastemakers radars and is one to watch.

Ivy lab – Focus

Ahead of their Fabric appearance, Ivy Lab drop “Focus” as a free download. The London trio of prolific D&B producers give us a treat with this track for a dancefloor filler, velvet roller that has both harsh and smooth elements too it. It has an emotive depth to it too. If you like what you hear make sure you head down to catch them in EC1.

Fekky ft Skepta – Way Too Much

It’s been around a year since Fekky and Skepta linked up for a collaboration for a remix. Now they join forces again for Fekky’s brand new single “Way Too Much” where Boy Better Know’s Skepta provides the hook and a verse over the minimal production, allowing the lyrics to take center stage. This is UK music at it’s best, with road rap and Grime joining for a banging track. Fekky’s album El Clasico will be dropping soon too.

 

Youngs Teflon – Run DMC

South London MC Youngs Teflon returns with “Run DMC” bringing the Summer vibes with his video. The instrumental has a melancholic, ethereal feel with Tefs dropping some truthful, hard-hitting bars.

 

July 22, 2012

Something From Nothing: The Art Of Rap

 

Last night saw the European premiere of Ice-T’s highly anticipated documentary, Something From Nothing: The Art of Rap. The event was not one to be missed for any hip-hop heads and lovers of wordplay. UK rappers we saw there included Sway, Wretch 32, Jehst, K. Koke and Exo

Contributing founder of gangster rap Ice-T enlisted legends of the hip-hop scene to talk us through their thought-processes, favourite rap lyrics and how they started out in the game.

An impressive amount of artists were featured, including Chuck DImmortal TechniqueNasRun-DMCSnoop DoggEminemDougie FreshGrandmaster CazDr DreKanye WestRakimJoe BuddenMelle Mel, Common and more.

We were taken right back to the basics, with New York back-drops heavily featured in the visuals, reminding us of hip-hop’s place of birth. Ice-T then took us through to Detroit and of course, to his turf – the West Coast. Interestingly enough, the south was not featured, leaving out some key players.

The film was quite fast-paced for a documentary film, which would keep some people entertained; however I found the quick transitions quite overwhelming at times.

Regardless, the film was informative and funny. Ice-T ensured there were many moments of humour, which made the film for me. Hip-hop is known to be an egotistical form of art, so it was refreshing to see lyricists discuss their most vulnerable moments.

 

One cringe-worthy revelation ironically came from Kanye West. As he was interviewed, he told us about his first rap battle, which went miserably wrong when his opponent delivered the line, ‘wassup, my name is Chris and let me tell you one thing, you smell like p***’ – obviously he lost that battle!

Snoop had his normal banter in check, saying his ‘main inspiration was having two women by his side.’

Ice-T asked the rappers to spontaneously spit their favourite lyrics of all time, and of course, they had to deliver. As expected, Ice-T knew every rhyme they presented to him and often rapped along.

When talking rap essentials, a lot of the rappers agreed that their voice and delivery was an important part. Chuck D said: ‘you had to have a strong voice to cut through the systems.’ Ice-T later praised Cypress Hill for their delivery of rhymes, saying: ‘When you came out, the vocal delivery was so real.’

Salt n Pepa and MC Lyte were the only females in the film, which was a bit disappointing as I felt others could have gotten involved, such as Lauryn Hill.

Overall, the docufilm delved into interesting subjects, thankfully neglecting the money, women and bling side of 21st century rap and concerning itself more with the technicalities of the art form and the business.

As the film finished, we were treated to phenomenal performances by Melle MelChuck D, RaekwonGhostface Killah and Ice-T; it was a tremendous showcase of linguistic skill which left me simply mesmerised.

April 3, 2012

Diggy Simmons Explains Reason Behind J. Cole Diss

Diggy Simmons explains the reason behind the J Cole diss on his recent leaked tracked What You Say To Me. In an interview with US radio station 99.1 FM, he claims he recorded the song after J Cole falsely claimed he had relations with his sister Vanessa on his track Purple Rain. Diggy claimed that the song was over a year old, but he felt the need to defend his family, and that the track wasn’t leaked by anyone in his camp.

“[There’s] no big story behind it, it was really just that my sister [Vanessa] over a year ago told me that [J. Cole] was saying that he did this, that and third with her, ‘cus the went to the same college [St. John’s], but they didn’t really know each other like that, so it wasn’t like that,” he said. “She also told me that he subliminally talked about her in a song called ‘Purple Rain,’ which was also false. So it was just me sticking up for my family, that’s all that it really was. I didn’t even leak it, it got leaked last night while I was at the movies…I did that record last year…I was gonna put it out, but I didn’t feel like it was appropriate, but of course, that’s my sister…family over everything. [My dad Reverend Run] had already heard the track and he was like the same thing: ‘Family over everything, that’s your sister,’ so he wasn’t mad at all.”